ACL Surgery

The Children’s Sports Medicine Program has expanded its scope of services throughout metro Atlanta—providing new programs, services and locations specifically for young athletes.

What does this data mean?
Recent trends have shown an increase in knee injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in young athletes, particularly in sports that involve a sudden deceleration, an outside cut or any maneuver that causes shear force across the knee joint.

The Sports Medicine Program has seen an increase in number of surgeries and thus developed a program to help with ACL injury prevention. This program is designed to improve speed, strength and agility, while incorporating proper mechanics and muscle recruitment for sports-related activities. With proper training, conditioning and the instruction of healthy guidelines, the risk of ACL injury will be reduced—all while improving sports performance.

What is an ACL and what does it do?
The ACL is located in the middle of the knee and functions to stabilize the joint. An ACL injury is either a partial or complete tear from direct knee trauma or an injury without contact. It is one of the four main ligaments in the knee that connect it to the shinbone (tibia) and thighbone (femur). The ACL keeps the shinbone in place and prevents it from moving too far forward and away from the knee and thighbone. It also provides stability when rotating the shinbone.

The ACL is located in the middle of the knee and functions to stabilize the joint. An ACL injury is either a partial or complete tear from direct knee trauma or an injury without contact. It is one of the four main ligaments in the knee that connect it to the shinbone (tibia) and thighbone (femur). The ACL keeps the shinbone in place and prevents it from moving too far forward and away from the knee and thighbone. It also provides stability when rotating the shinbone.