Mental Wellness

It’s no secret that the ability to focus our minds is critical in helping us deliver the best patient care every day. Understanding ourselves—and our brains—so we perform at peak condition is one way to continue to sharpen your mental focus. Dr. Joe Williams has some ideas for you to consider about multitasking’s effect on the mind and how to train your brain to stay well. 

Multitasking: A Survival Tool for Wellness or Road to Destruction?

Our Mighty Brain: Tricks for Avoiding Thanatos

Taking the time to pause and reflect each day is a great way to manage your energy and gives you the perfect opportunity to connect to your own sense of purpose as a human being, not a human “doing.” Two physicians show you how they incorporate recovery breaks into their day—one while at work in between patients, and the other, at home before the work day to help with his work/life success.

Restoration Is the Best Medicine for an Aflac Physician: The Value of Recovery Breaks

Mindfulness: One Physician’s Secret to Work/Life Success

Emotional Wellness

Just as physicians first diagnose a patient and then recommend a course of treatment, we must first work to understand how much stress and happiness we have in our own lives before we can begin to make improvements. Check out these stress and happiness assessments and get inspired by our colleague, Dr. Paul Parker, whose hobby makes him happier and helps him avoid burnout.

Explore Tools to Assess and Manage Stress

The Power of Happiness

Banjo-Playing Physician Avoids Burnout by Making Music

Saluting our Physician Moms on Mother's Day

Social Wellness

Balancing work and a life outside of career is often one of the most challenging tasks for a physician. At the same time, we know family and friends are some of the most important support systems available to caregivers, at any stage in their careers.

Children’s encourages our physicians to prioritize friends, family and a life outside of work. This includes regularly scheduling time with loved ones, and following through on the commitment. We encourage physicians to focus on the quality of time spent rather than the quantity of time. Physicians should disengage from work and electronics when spending time with loved ones, find hobbies and discover ways to get involved in leisure activities outside the office.

Dr. Joe Williams writes more on this topic and the research that has been done in this area.

Since most physicians continue working to achieve balance most of their career, it is often helpful to talk through social wellness tips and tools and find support with other physician colleagues. That is why Children’s created the Physician Wellbeing Mentor Program.

Physician Wellbeing Mentor Program

Children’s recently created the Physician Wellbeing Mentor Program that matches new physician hires with a physician that has been at Children’s at least five years, in an attempt to establish a trusting relationship and support the mentee by bridging the gap between mental, physical, and emotional wellness program offerings at Children’s.

If you are a Children’s physician and interested in learning more, email Kathleen.Smith3@choa.org.